Assessment

The 2014 UT Dallas Core Curriculum

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) has approved revisions to the core curriculum for Texas public institutions of higher education. These changes placed a 42-student-credit-hour limit on an institution’s core curriculum. In addition, the THECB promulgated six Core Objectives, replacing the exemplary educational objectives, and renamed several Component Areas—see the Quick Reference Chart.

UT Dallas is responsible for developing and submitting a new core curriculum to the THECB by November 30, 2013. The new core curriculum will be implemented in fall 2014; however, the existing core curriculum will be retained to accommodate students who entered the university prior to fall 2014.

Dr. Marilyn Kaplan, chair of the University's Core Curriculum Committee, provides the following update on the status of the UT Dallas Core Curriculum Changes for 2014, which was approved in fall 2012 by the following faculty governance committees:

  • Core Curriculum Committee
  • Council on Undergraduate Education
  • Committee on Educational Policy
  • Faculty Senate

Course inclusion in the new core is being finalized and the Core Curriculum Committee has developed a core course proposal system that matches the core objectives with student course learning outcomes. The Core Curriculum Committee is also developing an innovative assessment process. The new UT Dallas Core Curriculum will include:

  • Communication (6 SCH)
  • Mathematics (3 SCH)
  • Life and Physical Sciences (6 SCH)
  • Language, Philosophy and Culture (3 SCH)
  • Creative Arts (3 SCH)
  • American History (6 SCH)
  • Government/Political Science (6 SCH)
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences (3 SCH)
  • Component Area Option (6 SCH)[1]

Core Component Objectives

  • Critical Thinking Skills - to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information
  • Communication Skills - to include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication
  • Empirical and Quantitative Skills - to include the manipulation and analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions
  • Teamwork - to include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal
  • Personal Responsibility - to include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making
  • Social Responsibility: to include intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities

2014 Core Assessment

The THECB required core objectives are based on the Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP) initiative of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U).

A set of rubrics has been developed by AAC&U to facilitate implementation of the LEAP objectives. Because the new component area objectives developed by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board parallel to a large extent those rubrics, they may be useful in developing strategies to implement and assess student learning in the new core. The VALUE rubrics (Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education) may be accessed and downloaded at www.aacu.org/value/index.cfm.[2]

The following are the 15 VALUE rubrics the assessment team has aligned with the 6 CORE Objectives for the Foundational Component areas to provide a starting point for assessment planning for the new core curriculum. Download a PDF version of the VALUE Rubrics[3].


Shortcuts to Objectives

Objective 1 | Objective 2 | Objective 3 | Objective 4 | Objective 5 | Objective 6


Core Objective 1: Critical thinking skills – to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Critical thinking is a habit of mind characterized by the comprehensive exploration of issues, ideas, artifacts, and events before accepting or formulating an opinion or conclusion.

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Explanation of issues Issue/problem to be considered critically is stated clearly and described comprehensively, delivering all relevant information necessary for full understanding. Issue/problem to be considered critically is stated, described, and clarified so that understanding is not seriously impeded by omissions. Issue/problem to be considered critically is stated but description leaves some terms undefined, ambiguities unexplored, boundaries undetermined, and/or backgrounds unknown. Issue/problem to be considered critically is stated without clarification or description.
Evidence

Selecting and using information to investigate a point of view or conclusion
Information is taken from source(s) with enough interpretation/evaluation to develop a comprehensive analysis or synthesis. Viewpoints of experts are questioned thoroughly. Information is taken from source(s) with enough interpretation/evaluation to develop a coherent analysis or synthesis. Viewpoints of experts are subject to questioning. Information is taken from source(s) with some interpretation/evaluation, but not enough to develop a coherent analysis or synthesis. Viewpoints of experts are taken as mostly fact, with little questioning. Information is taken from source(s) without any interpretation/evaluation. Viewpoints of experts are taken as fact, without question.
Influence of context and assumptions Thoroughly (systematically and methodically) analyzes own and others' assumptions and carefully evaluates the relevance of contexts when presenting a position. Identifies own and others' assumptions and several relevant contexts when presenting a position. Questions some assumptions. Identifies several relevant contexts when presenting a position. May be more aware of others' assumptions than one's own (or vice versa). Shows an emerging awareness of present assumptions (sometimes labels assertions as assumptions). Begins to identify some contexts when presenting a position.
Student's position

(perspective, thesis/hypothesis)
Specific position (perspective, thesis/hypothesis) is imaginative, taking into account the complexities of an issue.
Limits of position (perspective, thesis/hypothesis) are acknowledged. Others' points of view are synthesized within position (perspective, thesis/hypothesis).
Specific position (perspective, thesis/hypothesis) takes into account the complexities of an issue. Others' points of view are acknowledged within position (perspective, thesis/hypothesis). Specific position (perspective, thesis/hypothesis) acknowledges different sides of an issue. Specific position (perspective, thesis/hypothesis) is stated, but is simplistic and obvious.
Conclusions and related outcomes

(implications and consequences)
Conclusions and related outcomes (consequences and implications) are logical and reflect student’s informed evaluation and ability to place evidence and perspectives discussed in priority order. Conclusion is logically tied to a range of information, including opposing viewpoints; related outcomes (consequences and implications) are identified clearly. Conclusion is logically tied to information (because information is chosen to fit the desired conclusion); some related outcomes (consequences and implications) are identified clearly. Conclusion is inconsistently tied to some of the information discussed; related outcomes (consequences and implications) are oversimplified.

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Creative thinking is both the capacity to combine or synthesize existing ideas, images, or expertise in original ways and the experience of thinking, reacting, and working in an imaginative way characterized by a high degree of innovation, divergent thinking, and risk taking.

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Acquiring Competencies

This step refers to acquiring strategies and skills within a particular domain.
IReflect: Evaluates creative process and product using domain-appropriate criteria. Create: Creates an entirely new object, solution or idea that is appropriate to the domain. Adapt: Successfully adapts an appropriate exemplar to his/her own specifications. Model: Successfully reproduces an appropriate exemplar.
Taking Risks

May include personal risk (fear of embarrassment or rejection) or risk of failure in successfully completing assignment, i.e. going beyond original parameters of assignment, introducing new materials and forms, tackling controversial topics, advocating unpopular ideas or solutions.
Actively seeks out and follows through on untested and potentially risky directions or approaches to the assignment in the final product. Incorporates new directions or approaches to the assignment in the final product. Considers new directions or approaches without going beyond the guidelines of the assignment. Stays strictly within the guidelines of the assignment.
Solving Problems Not only develops a logical, consistent plan to solve problem, but recognizes consequences of solution and can articulate reason for choosing solution. Having selected from among alternatives, develops a logical, consistent plan to solve the problem. Considers and rejects less acceptable approaches to solving problem. Only a single approach is considered and is used to solve the problem.
Embracing Contradictions Integrates alternate, divergent, or contradictory perspectives or ideas fully. Incorporates alternate, divergent, or contradictory perspectives or ideas in a exploratory way. Includes (recognizes the value of) alternate, divergent, or contradictory perspectives or ideas in a small way. Acknowledges (mentions in passing) alternate, divergent, or contradictory perspectives or ideas.
Innovative Thinking

Novelty or uniqueness (of idea, claim, question, form, etc.)
Extends a novel or unique idea, question, format, or product to create new knowledge or knowledge that crosses boundaries. Creates a novel or unique idea, question, format, or product. Experiments with creating a novel or unique idea, question, format, or product. Reformulates a collection of available ideas.
Connecting, Synthesizing, Transforming Transforms ideas or solutions into entirely new forms. Synthesizes ideas or solutions into a coherent whole. Connects ideas or solutions in novel ways. Recognizes existing connections among ideas or solutions.

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Inquiry is a systematic process of exploring issues/objects/works through the collection and analysis of evidence that result in informed conclusions/judgments. Analysis is the process of breaking complex topics or issues into parts to gain a better understanding of them.

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Topic selection Identifies a creative, focused, and manageable topic that addresses potentially significant yet previously less-explored aspects of the topic. Identifies a focused and manageable/doable topic that appropriately addresses relevant aspects of the topic. Identifies a topic that while manageable/doable, is too narrowly focused and leaves out relevant aspects of the topic. Identifies a topic that is far too general and wide-ranging as to be manageable and doable.
Existing Knowledge, Research, and/or Views Synthesizes in-depth information from relevant sources representing various points of view/approaches. Presents in-depth information from relevant sources representing various points of view/approaches. Presents information from relevant sources representing limited points of view/approaches. Presents information from irrelevant sources representing limited points of view/approaches.
Design Process All elements of the methodology or theoretical framework are skillfully developed. Appropriate methodology or theoretical frameworks may be synthesized from across disciplines or from relevant subdisciplines. Critical elements of the methodology or theoretical framework are appropriately developed, however, more subtle elements are ignored or unaccounted for. Critical elements of the methodology or theoretical framework are missing, incorrectly developed, or unfocused. Inquiry design demonstrates a misunderstanding of the methodology or theoretical framework.
Analysis Organizes and synthesizes evidence to reveal insightful patterns, differences, or similarities related to focus. Organizes evidence to reveal important patterns, differences, or similarities related to focus. Organizes evidence, but the organization is not effective in revealing important patterns, differences, or similarities. Lists evidence, but it is not organized and/or is unrelated to focus.
Conclusions States a conclusion that is a logical extrapolation from the inquiry findings. States a conclusion focused solely on the inquiry findings. The conclusion arises specifically from and responds specifically to the inquiry findings. States a general conclusion that, because it is so general, also applies beyond the scope of the inquiry findings. States an ambiguous, illogical, or unsupportable conclusion from inquiry findings.
Limitations and implications Insightfully discusses in detail relevant and supported limitations and implications. Discusses relevant and supported limitations and implications. Presents relevant and supported limitations and implications. Presents limitations and implications, but they are possibly irrelevant and unsupported.

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Integrative learning is an understanding and a disposition that a student builds across the curriculum and cocurriculum, from making simple connections among ideas and experiences to synthesizing and transferring learning to new, complex situations within and beyond the campus.

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Connections to Experience

Connects relevant experience and academic knowledge
Meaningfully synthesizes connections among experiences outside of the formal classroom (including life experiences and academic experiences such as internships and travel abroad) to deepen understanding of fields of study and to broaden own points of view. Effectively selects and develops examples of life experiences, drawn from a variety of contexts (e.g., family life, artistic participation, civic involvement, work experience), to illuminate concepts/theories/frameworks of fields of study. Compares life experiences and academic knowledge to infer differences, as well as similarities, and acknowledge perspectives other than own. Identifies connections between life experiences and those academic texts and ideas perceived as similar and related to own interests.
Connections to Discipline

Sees (makes) connections across disciplines, perspectives
Independently creates wholes out of multiple parts (synthesizes) or draws conclusions by combining examples, facts, or theories from more than one field of study or perspective. Independently connects examples, facts, or theories from more than one field of study or perspective. When prompted, connects examples, facts, or theories from more than one field of study or perspective. When prompted, presents examples, facts, or theories from more than one field of study or perspective.
Transfer

Adapts and applies skills, abilities, theories, or methodologies gained in one situation to new situations
Adapts and applies, independently, skills, abilities, theories, or methodologies gained in one situation to new situations to solve difficult problems or explore complex issues in original ways. Adapts and applies skills, abilities, theories, or methodologies gained in one situation to new situations to solve problems or explore issues. Uses skills, abilities, theories, or methodologies gained in one situation in a new situation to contribute to understanding of problems or issues. Uses, in a basic way, skills, abilities, theories, or methodologies gained in one situation in a new situation.
Integrated Communication Fulfills the assignment(s) by choosing a format, language, or graph (or other visual representation) in ways that enhance meaning, making clear the interdependence of language and meaning, thought, and expression. Fulfills the assignment(s) by choosing a format, language, or graph (or other visual representation) to explicitly connect content and form, demonstrating awareness of purpose and audience. Fulfills the assignment(s) by choosing a format, language, or graph (or other visual representation) that connects in a basic way what is being communicated (content) with how it is said (form). Fulfills the assignment(s) (i.e. to produce an essay, a poster, a video, a PowerPoint presentation, etc.) in an appropriate form.
Reflection and Self-Assessment

Demonstrates a developing sense of self as a learner, building on prior experiences to respond to new and challenging contexts (may be evident in self-assessment, reflective, or creative work)
Envisions a future self (and possibly makes plans that build on past experiences) that have occurred across multiple and diverse contexts. Evaluates changes in own learning over time, recognizing complex contextual factors (e.g., works with ambiguity and risk, deals with frustration, considers ethical frameworks). Articulates strengths and challenges (within specific performances or events) to increase effectiveness in different contexts (through increased self-awareness). Describes own performances with general descriptors of success and failure.
Core Objective 2: Communication skills – to include effective written, oral, and visual communication.

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Written communication is the development and expression of ideas in writing. Written communication involves learning to work in many genres and styles. It can involve working with many different writing technologies, and mixing texts, data, and images. Written communication abilities develop through iterative experiences across the curriculum.

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Context of and Purpose for Writing

Includes considerations of audience, purpose, and the circumstances surrounding the writing task(s).
Demonstrates a thorough understanding of context, audience, and purpose that is responsive to the assigned task(s) and focuses all elements of the work. Demonstrates adequate consideration of context, audience, and purpose and a clear focus on the assigned task(s) (e.g., the task aligns with audience, purpose, and context). Demonstrates awareness of context, audience, purpose, and to the assigned tasks(s) (e.g., begins to show awareness of audience's perceptions and assumptions). Demonstrates minimal attention to context, audience, purpose, and to the assigned tasks(s) (e.g., expectation of instructor or self as audience).
Content Development Uses appropriate, relevant, and compelling content to illustrate mastery of the subject, conveying the writer's understanding, and shaping the whole work. Uses appropriate, relevant, and compelling content to explore ideas within the context of the discipline and shape the whole work. Uses appropriate and relevant content to develop and explore ideas through most of the work. Uses appropriate and relevant content to develop simple ideas in some parts of the work.
Genre and Disciplinary Conventions

Formal and informal rules inherent in the expectations for writing in particular forms and/or academic fields (please see glossary).
Demonstrates detailed attention to and successful execution of a wide range of conventions particular to a specific discipline and/or writing task (s) including organization, content, presentation, formatting, and stylistic choices Demonstrates consistent use of important conventions particular to a specific discipline and/or writing task(s), including organization, content, presentation, and stylistic choices. Follows expectations appropriate to a specific discipline and/or writing task(s) for basic organization, content, and presentation. Attempts to use a consistent system for basic organization and presentation.
Sources and Evidence Demonstrates skillful use of high-quality, credible, relevant sources to develop ideas that are appropriate for the discipline and genre of the writing. Demonstrates consistent use of credible, relevant sources to support ideas that are situated within the discipline and genre of the writing. Demonstrates an attempt to use credible and/or relevant sources to support ideas that are appropriate for the discipline and genre of the writing. Demonstrates an attempt to use sources to support ideas in the writing.
Control of Syntax and Mechanics Uses graceful language that skillfully communicates meaning to readers with clarity and fluency, and is virtually error-free. Uses straightforward language that generally conveys meaning to readers. The language in the portfolio has few errors. Uses language that generally conveys meaning to readers with clarity, although writing may include some errors. Uses language that sometimes impedes meaning because of errors in usage.

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Oral communication is a prepared, purposeful presentation designed to increase knowledge, to foster understanding, or to promote change in the listeners' attitudes, values, beliefs, or behaviors.

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Organization Organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is clearly and consistently observable and is skillful and makes the content of the presentation cohesive. Organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is clearly and consistently observable within the presentation. Organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is intermittently observable within the presentation. Organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is not observable within the presentation.
Languages Language choices are imaginative, memorable, and compelling, and enhance the effectiveness of the presentation. Language in presentation is appropriate to audience. Language choices are thoughtful and generally support the effectiveness of the presentation. Language in presentation is appropriate to audience. Language choices are mundane and commonplace and partially support the effectiveness of the presentation. Language in presentation is appropriate to audience. Language choices are unclear and minimally support the effectiveness of the presentation. Language in presentation is not appropriate to audience.
Delivery Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) make the presentation compelling, and speaker appears polished and confident. Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) make the presentation interesting, and speaker appears comfortable. Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) make the presentation understandable, and speaker appears tentative. Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) detract from the understandability of the presentation, and speaker appears uncomfortable.
Supporting Material A variety of types of supporting materials (explanations, examples, illustrations, statistics, analogies, quotations from relevant authorities) make appropriate reference to information or analysis that significantly supports the presentation or establishes the presenter's credibility/authority on the topic. Supporting materials (explanations, examples, illustrations, statistics, analogies, quotations from relevant authorities) make appropriate reference to information or analysis that generally supports the presentation or establishes the presenter's credibility/authority on the topic. Supporting materials (explanations, examples, illustrations, statistics, analogies, quotations from relevant authorities) make appropriate reference to information or analysis that partially supports the presentation or establishes the presenter's credibility/authority on the topic. Insufficient supporting materials (explanations, examples, illustrations, statistics, analogies, quotations from relevant authorities) make reference to information or analysis that minimally supports the presentation or establishes the presenter's credibility/authority on the topic.
Central Message Central message is compelling (precisely stated, appropriately repeated, memorable, and strongly supported.) Central message is clear and consistent with the supporting material. Central message is basically understandable but is not often repeated and is not memorable. Central message can be deduced, but is not explicitly stated in the presentation.

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Reading is "the process of simultaneously extracting and constructing meaning through interaction and involvement with written language" (Snow et al., 2002). (From www.rand.org/pubs/research_briefs/RB8024/index1.html)

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Comprehension Recognizes possible implications of the text for contexts, perspectives, or issues beyond the assigned task within the classroom or beyond the author’s explicit message (e.g., might recognize broader issues at play, or might pose challenges to the author’s message and presentation). Uses the text, general background knowledge, and/or specific knowledge of the author’s context to draw more complex inferences about the author’s message and attitude. Evaluates how textual features (e.g., sentence and paragraph structure or tone) contribute to the author’s message; draws basic inferences about context and purpose of text. Apprehends vocabulary appropriately to paraphrase or summarize the information the text communicates.
Genres Uses ability to identify texts within and across genres, monitoring and adjusting reading strategies and expectations based on generic nuances of particular texts. Articulates distinctions among genres and their characteristic conventions. Reflects on reading experiences across a variety of genres, reading both with and against the grain experimentally and intentionally. Applies tacit genre knowledge to a variety of classroom reading assignments in productive, if unreflective, ways.
Relationship to Text

Making meanings with texts in their contexts
Evaluates texts for scholarly significance and relevance within and across the various disciplines, evaluating them according to their contributions and consequences. Uses texts in the context of scholarship to develop a foundation of disciplinary knowledge and to raise and explore important questions. Engages texts with the intention and expectation of building topical and world knowledge. Approaches texts in the context of assignments with the intention and expectation of finding right answers and learning facts and concepts to display for credit.
Analysis

Interacting with texts in parts and as wholes
Evaluates strategies for relating ideas, text structure, or other textual features in order to build knowledge or insight within and across texts and disciplines. Identifies relations among ideas, text structure, or other textual features, to evaluate how they support an advanced understanding of the text as a whole. Recognizes relations among parts or aspects of a text, such as effective or ineffective arguments or literary features, in considering how these contribute to a basic understanding of the text as a whole. Identifies aspects of a text (e.g., content, structure, or relations among ideas) as needed to respond to questions posed in assigned tasks.
Interpretation

Making sense with texts as blueprints for meaning
Provides evidence not only that s/he can read by using an appropriate epistemological lens but that s/he can also engage in reading as part of a continuing dialogue within and beyond a discipline or a community of readers. Articulates an understanding of the multiple ways of reading and the range of interpretive strategies particular to one's discipline(s) or in a given community of readers. Demonstrates that s/he can read purposefully, choosing among interpretive strategies depending on the purpose of the reading. Can identify purpose(s) for reading, relying on an external authority such as an instructor for clarification of the task.
Reader's Voice

Participating in academic discourse about texts
Discusses texts with an independent intellectual and ethical disposition so as to further or maintain disciplinary conversations. Elaborates on the texts (through interpretation or questioning) so as to deepen or enhance an ongoing discussion. Discusses texts in structured conversations (such as in a classroom) in ways that contribute to a basic, shared understanding of the text. Comments about texts in ways that preserve the author's meanings and link them to the assignment.
Core Objective 3: Empirical and Quantitative skills – to include the manipulation and analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions.

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Quantitative Literacy (QL) – also known as Numeracy or Quantitative Reasoning (QR) – is a "habit of mind," competency, and comfort in working with numerical data. Individuals with strong QL skills possess the ability to reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations. They understand and can create sophisticated arguments supported by quantitative evidence and they can clearly communicate those arguments in a variety of formats (using words, tables, graphs, mathematical equations, etc., as appropriate).

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Interpretation

Ability to explain information presented in mathematical forms (e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words)
Provides accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms. Makes appropriate inferences based on that information. For example, accurately explains the trend data shown in a graph and makes reasonable predictions regarding what the data suggest about future events. Provides accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms. For instance, accurately explains the trend data shown in a graph. Provides somewhat accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms, but occasionally makes minor errors related to computations or units. For instance, accurately explains trend data shown in a graph, but may miscalculate the slope of the trend line. Attempts to explain information presented in mathematical forms, but draws incorrect conclusions about what the information means. For example, attempts to explain the trend data shown in a graph, but will frequently misinterpret the nature of that trend, perhaps by confusing positive and negative trends.
Representation

Ability to convert relevant information into various mathematical forms (e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words)
Skillfully converts relevant information into an insightful mathematical portrayal in a way that contributes to a further or deeper understanding. Competently converts relevant information into an appropriate and desired mathematical portrayal. Completes conversion of information but resulting mathematical portrayal is only partially appropriate or accurate. Completes conversion of information but resulting mathematical portrayal is inappropriate or inaccurate.
Calculation Calculations attempted are essentially all successful and sufficiently comprehensive to solve the problem. Calculations are also presented elegantly (clearly, concisely, etc.) Calculations attempted are essentially all successful and sufficiently comprehensive to solve the problem. Calculations attempted are either unsuccessful or represent only a portion of the calculations required to comprehensively solve the problem. Calculations are attempted but are both unsuccessful and are not comprehensive.
Application / Analysis

Ability to make judgments and draw appropriate conclusions based on the quantitative analysis of data, while recognizing the limits of this analysis
Uses the quantitative analysis of data as the basis for deep and thoughtful judgments, drawing insightful, carefully qualified conclusions from this work. Uses the quantitative analysis of data as the basis for competent judgments, drawing reasonable and appropriately qualified conclusions from this work. Uses the quantitative analysis of data as the basis for workmanlike (without inspiration or nuance, ordinary) judgments, drawing plausible conclusions from this work. Uses the quantitative analysis of data as the basis for tentative, basic judgments, although is hesitant or uncertain about drawing conclusions from this work.
Assumptions

Ability to make and evaluate important assumptions in estimation, modeling, and data analysis
Explicitly describes assumptions and provides compelling rationale for why each assumption is appropriate. Shows awareness that confidence in final conclusions is limited by the accuracy of the assumptions. Explicitly describes assumptions and provides compelling rationale for why assumptions are appropriate. Explicitly describes assumptions. Attempts to describe assumptions.
Communication

Expressing quantitative evidence in support of the argument or purpose of the work (in terms of what evidence is used and how it is formatted, presented, and contextualized)
Uses quantitative information in connection with the argument or purpose of the work, presents it in an effective format, and explicates it with consistently high quality. Uses quantitative information in connection with the argument or purpose of the work, though data may be presented in a less than completely effective format or some parts of the explication may be uneven. Uses quantitative information, but does not effectively connect it to the argument or purpose of the work. Presents an argument for which quantitative evidence is pertinent, but does not provide adequate explicit numerical support. (May use quasi-quantitative words such as "many," "few," "increasing," "small," and the like in place of actual quantities.)

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Problem solving is the process of designing, evaluating, and implementing a strategy to answer an open-ended question or achieve a desired goal.

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Define Problem Demonstrates the ability to construct a clear and insightful problem statement with evidence of all relevant contextual factors. Demonstrates the ability to construct a problem statement with evidence of most relevant contextual factors, and problem statement is adequately detailed. Begins to demonstrate the ability to construct a problem statement with evidence of most relevant contextual factors, but problem statement is superficial. Demonstrates a limited ability in identifying a problem statement or related contextual factors.
Identify Strategies Identifies multiple approaches for solving the problem that apply within a specific context. Identifies multiple approaches for solving the problem, only some of which apply within a specific context. Identifies only a single approach for solving the problem that does apply within a specific context. Identifies one or more approaches for solving the problem that do not apply within a specific context.
Propose Solutions/Hypotheses Proposes one or more solutions/hypotheses that indicates a deep comprehension of the problem. Solution/hypotheses are sensitive to contextual factors as well as all of the following: ethical, logical, and cultural dimensions of the problem. Proposes one or more solutions/hypotheses that indicates comprehension of the problem. Solutions/hypotheses are sensitive to contextual factors as well as the one of the following: ethical, logical, or cultural dimensions of the problem. Proposes one solution/hypothesis that is “off the shelf” rather than individually designed to address the specific contextual factors of the problem. Proposes a solution/hypothesis that is difficult to evaluate because it is vague or only indirectly addresses the problem statement.
Evaluate Potential Solutions Evaluation of solutions is deep and elegant (for example, contains thorough and insightful explanation) and includes, deeply and thoroughly, all of the following: considers history of problem, reviews logic/reasoning, examines feasibility of solution, and weighs impacts of solution. Evaluation of solutions is adequate (for example, contains thorough explanation) and includes the following: considers history of problem, reviews logic/reasoning, examines feasibility of solution, and weighs impacts of solution. Evaluation of solutions is brief (for example, explanation lacks depth) and includes the following: considers history of problem, reviews logic/reasoning, examines feasibility of solution, and weighs impacts of solution. Evaluation of solutions is superficial (for example, contains cursory, surface level explanation) and includes the following: considers history of problem, reviews logic/reasoning, examines feasibility of solution, and weighs impacts of solution.
Implement Solution Implements the solution in a manner that addresses thoroughly and deeply multiple contextual factors of the problem. Implements the solution in a manner that addresses multiple contextual factors of the problem in a surface manner. Implements the solution in a manner that addresses the problem statement but ignores relevant contextual factors. Implements the solution in a manner that does not directly address the problem statement.
Evaluate Outcomes Reviews results relative to the problem defined with thorough, specific considerations of need for further work. Reviews results relative to the problem defined with some consideration of need for further work. Reviews results in terms of the problem defined with little, if any, consideration of need for further work. Reviews results superficially in terms of the problem defined with no consideration of need for further work

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Inquiry is a systematic process of exploring issues/objects/works through the collection and analysis of evidence that result in informed conclusions/judgments. Analysis is the process of breaking complex topics or issues into parts to gain a better understanding of them.

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Topic selection Identifies a creative, focused, and manageable topic that addresses potentially significant yet previously less-explored aspects of the topic. Identifies a focused and manageable/doable topic that appropriately addresses relevant aspects of the topic. Identifies a topic that while manageable/doable, is too narrowly focused and leaves out relevant aspects of the topic. Identifies a topic that is far too general and wide-ranging as to be manageable and doable.
Existing Knowledge, Research, and/or Views Synthesizes in-depth information from relevant sources representing various points of view/approaches. Presents in-depth information from relevant sources representing various points of view/approaches. Presents information from relevant sources representing limited points of view/approaches. Presents information from irrelevant sources representing limited points of view/approaches.
Design Process All elements of the methodology or theoretical framework are skillfully developed. Appropriate methodology or theoretical frameworks may be synthesized from across disciplines or from relevant subdisciplines. Critical elements of the methodology or theoretical framework are appropriately developed, however, more subtle elements are ignored or unaccounted for. Proposes one solution/hypothesis that is “off the shelf” rather than individually designed to address the specific contextual factors of the problem. Inquiry design demonstrates a misunderstanding of the methodology or theoretical framework.
Analysis Organizes and synthesizes evidence to reveal insightful patterns, differences, or similarities related to focus. Organizes evidence to reveal important patterns, differences, or similarities related to focus. Organizes evidence, but the organization is not effective in revealing important patterns, differences, or similarities. Lists evidence, but it is not organized and/or is unrelated to focus.
Conclusions States a conclusion that is a logical extrapolation from the inquiry findings. States a conclusion focused solely on the inquiry findings. The conclusion arises specifically from and responds specifically to the inquiry findings. States a general conclusion that, because it is so general, also applies beyond the scope of the inquiry findings. States an ambiguous, illogical, or unsupportable conclusion from inquiry findings.
Limitations and Implications Insightfully discusses in detail relevant and supported limitations and implications. Discusses relevant and supported limitations and implications. Presents relevant and supported limitations and implications. Presents limitations and implications, but they are possibly irrelevant and unsupported.

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
INFORMATION LITERACY: The ability to know when there is a need for information, to be able to identify, locate, evaluate, and effectively and responsibly use and share that information for the problem at hand. - The National Forum on Information Literacy

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Determine the Extent of Information Needed Effectively defines the scope of the research question or thesis. Effectively determines key concepts. Types of information (sources) selected directly relate to concepts or answer research question. Identifies a focused and manageable/doable topic that appropriately addresses relevant aspects of the topic. Identifies a topic that while manageable/doable, is too narrowly focused and leaves out relevant aspects of the topic. Identifies a topic that is far too general and wide-ranging as to be manageable and doable.
Access the Needed Information Accesses information using effective, well-designed search strategies and most appropriate information sources. Presents in-depth information from relevant sources representing various points of view/approaches. Presents information from relevant sources representing limited points of view/approaches. Presents information from irrelevant sources representing limited points of view/approaches.
Evaluate Information and its Sources Criticall Thoroughly (systematically and methodically) analyzes own and others' assumptions and carefully evaluates the relevance of contexts when presenting a position. Critical elements of the methodology or theoretical framework are appropriately developed, however, more subtle elements are ignored or unaccounted for. Proposes one solution/hypothesis that is “off the shelf” rather than individually designed to address the specific contextual factors of the problem. Inquiry design demonstrates a misunderstanding of the methodology or theoretical framework.
Use Information Effectively to Accomplish a Specific Purpose Communicates, organizes and synthesizes information from sources to fully achieve a specific purpose, with clarity and depth. Organizes evidence to reveal important patterns, differences, or similarities related to focus. Organizes evidence, but the organization is not effective in revealing important patterns, differences, or similarities. Lists evidence, but it is not organized and/or is unrelated to focus.
Access and Use Information Ethically and Legally States a conclusion that is a logical extrapolation from the inquiry findings. States a conclusion focused solely on the inquiry findings. The conclusion arises specifically from and responds specifically to the inquiry findings. States a general conclusion that, because it is so general, also applies beyond the scope of the inquiry findings. States an ambiguous, illogical, or unsupportable conclusion from inquiry findings.
Core Objective 4: Teamwork – to include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal.

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Teamwork is behaviors under the control of individual team members (effort they put into team tasks, their manner of interacting with others on team, and the quantity and quality of contributions they make to team discussions.)

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Contributes to Team Meetings Helps the team move forward by articulating the merits of alternative ideas or proposals. Offers alternative solutions or courses of action that build on the ideas of others. Offers new suggestions to advance the work of the group. Shares ideas but does not advance the work of the group.
Facilitates the Contributions of Team Members Engages team members in ways that facilitate their contributions to meetings by both constructively building upon or synthesizing the contributions of others as well as noticing when someone is not participating and inviting them to engage. Engages team members in ways that facilitate their contributions to meetings by constructively building upon or synthesizing the contributions of others. Engages team members in ways that facilitate their contributions to meetings by restating the views of other team members and/or asking questions for clarification. Engages team members by taking turns and listening to others without interrupting.
Individual Contributions Outside of Team Meetings Completes all assigned tasks by deadline;
work accomplished is thorough, comprehensive, and advances the project.

Proactively helps other team members complete their assigned tasks to a similar level of excellence.
Completes all assigned tasks by deadline; work accomplished is thorough, comprehensive, and advances the project. Completes all assigned tasks by deadline; work accomplished advances the project. Completes all assigned tasks by deadline.
Fosters Constructive Team Climate Supports a constructive team climate by doing all of the following:
  • Treats team members respectfully by being polite and constructive in communication.
  • Uses positive vocal or written tone, facial expressions, and/or body language to convey a positive attitude about the team and its work.
  • Motivates teammates by expressing confidence about the importance of the task and the team's ability to accomplish it.
  • Provides assistance and/or encouragement to team members.
Supports a constructive team climate by doing any three of the following:
  • Treats team members respectfully by being polite and constructive in communication.
  • Uses positive vocal or written tone, facial expressions, and/or body language to convey a positive attitude about the team and its work.
  • Motivates teammates by expressing confidence about the importance of the task and the team's ability to accomplish it.
  • Provides assistance and/or encouragement to team members.
Supports a constructive team climate by doing any two of the following:
  • Treats team members respectfully by being polite and constructive in communication.
  • Uses positive vocal or written tone, facial expressions, and/or body language to convey a positive attitude about the team and its work.
  • Motivates teammates by expressing confidence about the importance of the task and the team's ability to accomplish it.
  • Provides assistance and/or encouragement to team members.
Supports a constructive team climate by doing any one of the following:
  • Treats team members respectfully by being polite and constructive in communication.
  • Uses positive vocal or written tone, facial expressions, and/or body language to convey a positive attitude about the team and its work.
  • Motivates teammates by expressing confidence about the importance of the task and the team's ability to accomplish it.
  • Provides assistance and/or encouragement to team members
Responds to Conflict Addresses destructive conflict directly and constructively, helping to manage/resolve it in a way that strengthens overall team cohesiveness and future effectiveness. Identifies and acknowledges conflict and stays engaged with it. Redirecting focus toward common ground, toward task at hand (away from conflict). Passively accepts alternate viewpoints/ideas/opinions.
Core Objective 5: Social Responsibility – to include intercultural competency, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities.

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Civic engagement is "working to make a difference in the civic life of our communities and developing the combination of knowledge, skills, values, and motivation to make that difference. It means promoting the quality of life in a community, through both political and non-political processes." (Excerpted from Civic Responsibility and Higher Education, edited by Thomas Ehrlich, published by Oryx Press, 2000, Preface, page vi.) In addition, civic engagement encompasses actions wherein individuals participate in activities of personal and public concern that are both individually life enriching and socially beneficial to the community.

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Diversity of Communities and Cultures Demonstrates evidence of adjustment in own attitudes and beliefs because of working within and learning from diversity of communities and cultures. Promotes others' engagement with diversity. Reflects on how own attitudes and beliefs are different from those of other cultures and communities. Exhibits curiosity about what can be learned from diversity of communities and cultures. Has awareness that own attitudes and beliefs are different from those of other cultures and communities. Exhibits little curiosity about what can be learned from diversity of communities and cultures. Expresses attitudes and beliefs as an individual, from a one-sided view. Is indifferent or resistant to what can be learned from diversity of communities and cultures.
Analysis of Knowledge Connects and extends knowledge (facts, theories, etc.) from one's own academic study/field/discipline to civic engagement and to one's own participation in civic life, politics, and government. Analyzes knowledge (facts, theories, etc.) from one's own academic study/field/discipline making relevant connections to civic engagement and to one's own participation in civic life, politics, and government. Begins to connect knowledge (facts, theories, etc.) from one's own academic study/field/discipline to civic engagement and to tone's own participation in civic life, politics, and government. Begins to identify knowledge (facts, theories, etc.) from one's own academic study/field/discipline that is relevant to civic engagement and to one's own participation in civic life, politics, and government.
Civic Identity and Commitment Provides evidence of experience in civic-engagement activities and describes what she/he has learned about her or himself as it relates to a reinforced and clarified sense of civic identity and continued commitment to public action. Provides evidence of experience in civic-engagement activities and describes what she/he has learned about her or himself as it relates to a growing sense of civic identity and commitment. Evidence suggests involvement in civic-engagement activities is generated from expectations or course requirements rather than from a sense of civic identity. Provides little evidence of her/his experience in civic-engagement activities and does not connect experiences to civic identity.
Civic Communication SuTailors communication strategies to effectively express, listen, and adapt to others to establish relationships to further civic action Effectively communicates in civic context, showing ability to do all of the following: express, listen, and adapt ideas and messages based on others' perspectives. Communicates in civic context, showing ability to do more than one of the following: express, listen, and adapt ideas and messages based on others' perspectives. Communicates in civic context, showing ability to do one of the following: express, listen, and adapt ideas and messages based on others' perspectives.
Civic Action and Reflection Demonstrates independent experience and shows initiative in team leadership of complex or multiple civic engagement activities, accompanied by reflective insights or analysis about the aims and accomplishments of one’s actions. Demonstrates independent experience and team leadership of civic action, with reflective insights or analysis about the aims and accomplishments of one’s actions. Has clearly participated in civically focused actions and begins to reflect or describe how these actions may benefit individual(s) or communities. Has experimented with some civic activities but shows little internalized understanding of their aims or effects and little commitment to future action.
Civic Contexts/Structures Demonstrates ability and commitment to collaboratively work across and within community contexts and structures to achieve a civic aim. Demonstrates ability and commitment to work actively within community contexts and structures to achieve a civic aim. Demonstrates experience identifying intentional ways to participate in civic contexts and structures. Experiments with civic contexts and structures, tries out a few to see what fits.

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Intercultural Knowledge and Competence is "a set of cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts.” (Bennett, J. M. 2008. Transformative training: Designing programs for culture learning. In Contemporary leadership and intercultural competence: Understanding and utilizing cultural diversity to build successful organizations, ed. M. A. Moodian, 95-110. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.)

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Knowledge

Cultural self- awareness
Articulates insights into own cultural rules and biases (e.g. seeking complexity; aware of how her/his experiences have shaped these rules, and how to recognize and respond to cultural biases, resulting in a shift in self-description.) Recognizes new perspectives about own cultural rules and biases (e.g. not looking for sameness; comfortable with the complexities that new perspectives offer.) Identifies own cultural rules and biases (e.g. with a strong preference for those rules shared with own cultural group and seeks the same in others.) Shows minimal awareness of own cultural rules and biases (even those shared with own cultural group(s)) (e.g. uncomfortable with identifying possible cultural differences with others.)
Knowledge

Knowledge of cultural worldview frameworks
Demonstrates sophisticated understanding of the complexity of elements important to members of another culture in relation to its history, values, politics, communication styles, economy, or beliefs and practices. Demonstrates adequate understanding of the complexity of elements important to members of another culture in relation to its history, values, politics, communication styles, economy, or beliefs and practices. Demonstrates partial understanding of the complexity of elements important to members of another culture in relation to its history, values, politics, communication styles, economy, or beliefs and practices. Demonstrates surface understanding of the complexity of elements important to members of another culture in relation to its history, values, politics, communication styles, economy, or beliefs and practices.
Skills

Empathy
Interprets intercultural experience from the perspectives of own and more than one worldview and demonstrates ability to act in a supportive manner that recognizes the feelings of another cultural group. Recognizes intellectual and emotional dimensions of more than one worldview and sometimes uses more than one worldview in interactions. Identifies components of other cultural perspectives but responds in all situations with own worldview. Views the experience of others but does so through own cultural worldview.
Skills

Verbal and nonverbal communication
Articulates a complex understanding of cultural differences in verbal and nonverbal communication (e.g., demonstrates understanding of the degree to which people use physical contact while communicating in different cultures or use direct/indirect and explicit/implicit meanings) and is able to skillfully negotiate a shared understanding based on those differences. Recognizes and participates in cultural differences in verbal and nonverbal communication and begins to negotiate a shared understanding based on those differences. Identifies some cultural differences in verbal and nonverbal communication and is aware that misunderstandings can occur based on those differences but is still unable to negotiate a shared understanding. Has a minimal level of understanding of cultural differences in verbal and nonverbal communication; is unable to negotiate a shared understanding.
Attitudes

Curiosity
Asks complex questions about other cultures, seeks out and articulates answers to these questions that reflect multiple cultural perspectives. Asks deeper questions about other cultures and seeks out answers to these questions. Asks simple or surface questions about other cultures. States minimal interest in learning more about other cultures.
Attitudes

Openness
Initiates and develops interactions with culturally different others. Suspends judgment in valuing her/his interactions with culturally different others. Begins to initiate and develop interactions with culturally different others. Begins to suspend judgment in valuing her/his interactions with culturally different others. Expresses openness to most, if not all, interactions with culturally different others. Has difficulty suspending any judgment in her/his interactions with culturally different others, and is aware of own judgment and expresses a willingness to change. Receptive to interacting with culturally different others. Has difficulty suspending any judgment in her/his interactions with culturally different others, but is unaware of own judgment.
Core Objective 6: Personal Responsibility – to include the ability to connect choices, actions, and consequences to ethical decision-making.

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Ethical Reasoning is reasoning about right and wrong human conduct. It requires students to be able to assess their own ethical values and the social context of problems, recognize ethical issues in a variety of settings, think about how different ethical perspectives might be applied to ethical dilemmas, and consider the ramifications of alternative actions. Students’ ethical self-identity evolves as they practice ethical decision-making skills and learn how to describe and analyze positions on ethical issues.

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Ethical Self-Awareness Student discusses in detail/analyzes both core beliefs and the origins of the core beliefs and discussion has greater depth and clarity. Student discusses in detail/analyzes both core beliefs and the origins of the core beliefs. Student states both core beliefs and the origins of the core beliefs. Student states either their core beliefs or articulates the origins of the core beliefs but not both.
Understanding Different Ethical Perspectives/Concepts Student names the theory or theories, can present the gist of said theory or theories, and accurately explains the details of the theory or theories used. Student can name the major theory or theories she/he uses, can present the gist of said theory or theories, and attempts to explain the details of the theory or theories used, but has some inaccuracies. Student can name the major theory she/he uses, and is only able to present the gist of the named theory. Student only names the major theory she/he uses.
Ethical Issue Recognition Student can recognize ethical issues when presented in a complex, multilayered (gray) context AND can recognize cross-relationships among the issues. Student can recognize ethical issues when issues are presented in a complex, multilayered (gray) context OR can grasp cross-relationships among the issues. Student can recognize basic and obvious ethical issues and grasp (incompletely) the complexities or interrelationships among the issues. Student can recognize basic and obvious ethical issues but fails to grasp complexity or interrelationships.
Application of Ethical Perspectives/Concepts Student can independently apply ethical perspectives/concepts to an ethical question, accurately, and is able to consider full implications of the application. Student can independently (to a new example) apply ethical perspectives/concepts to an ethical question, accurately, but does not consider the specific implications of the application. Student can apply ethical perspectives/concepts to an ethical question, independently (to a new example) and the application is inaccurate. Student can apply ethical perspectives/concepts to an ethical question with support (using examples, in a class, in a group, or a fixed-choice setting) but is unable to apply ethical perspectives/concepts independently (to a new example.).
Evaluation of Different Ethical Perspectives/Concepts Student states a position and can state the objections to, assumptions and implications of and can reasonably defend against the objections to, assumptions and implications of different ethical perspectives/concepts, and the student's defense is adequate and effective. Student states a position and can state the objections to, assumptions and implications of, and respond to the objections to, assumptions and implications of different ethical perspectives/concepts, but the student's response is inadequate. Student states a position and can state the objections to, assumptions and implications of different ethical perspectives/concepts but does not respond to them (and ultimately objections, assumptions, and implications are compartmentalized by student and do not affect student's position.) Student states a position but cannot state the objections to and assumptions and limitations of the different perspectives/concepts.

AAC&U LEAP Essential Learning Outcome Definition
Lifelong learning is “all purposeful learning activity, undertaken on an ongoing basis with the aim of improving knowledge, skills and competence”. An endeavor of higher education is to prepare students to be this type of learner by developing tspecific dispositions and skills (described in this rubric) while in school. (From The European Commission. 2000. Commission staff working paper: A memorandum on lifelong learning. Retrieved September 3, 2003, from http://www.see-educoop.net/education_in/pdf/lifelong-oth-enl-t02.pdf)

  Capstone Milestones Benchmark
  4 3 2 1
Curiosity Explores a topic in depth, yielding a rich awareness and/or little-known information indicating intense interest in the subject. Explores a topic in depth, yielding insight and/or information indicating interest in the subject. Explores a topic with some evidence of depth, providing occasional insight and/or information indicating mild interest in the subject. Explores a topic at a surface level, providing little insight and/or information beyond the very basic facts indicating low interest in the subject.
Initiative Completes required work, generates and pursues opportunities to expand knowledge, skills, and abilities. Completes required work, identifies and pursues opportunities to expand knowledge, skills, and abilities. Completes required work and identifies opportunities to expand knowledge, skills, and abilities. Completes required work.
Independence Educational interests and pursuits exist and flourish outside classroom requirements. Knowledge and/or experiences are pursued independently. Beyond classroom requirements, pursues substantial, additional knowledge and/or actively pursues independent educational experiences. Beyond classroom requirements, pursues additional knowledge and/or shows interest in pursuing independent educational experiences. Begins to look beyond classroom requirements, showing interest in pursuing knowledge independently.
Transfer Makes explicit references to previous learning and applies in an innovative (new and creative) way that knowledge and those skills to demonstrate comprehension and performance in novel situations. Makes references to previous learning and shows evidence of applying that knowledge and those skills to demonstrate comprehension and performance in novel situations. Makes references to previous learning and attempts to apply that knowledge and those skills to demonstrate comprehension and performance in novel situations. Makes vague references to previous learning but does not apply knowledge and skills to demonstrate comprehension and performance in novel situations.
Reflection Reviews prior learning (past experiences inside and outside of the classroom) in depth to reveal significantly changed perspectives about educational and life experiences, which provide foundation for expanded knowledge, growth, and maturity over time. Reviews prior learning (past experiences inside and outside of the classroom) in depth, revealing fully clarified meanings or indicating broader perspectives about educational or life events. Reviews prior learning (past experiences inside and outside of the classroom) with some depth, revealing slightly clarified meanings or indicating a somewhat broader perspectives about educational or life events. Reviews prior learning (past experiences inside and outside of the classroom) at a surface level, without revealing clarified meaning or indicating a broader perspective about educational or life events.


1 UT Dallas' faculty governance committees have voted that the faculty of the degree programs will determine CAO courses.

2 Extracted from Debra Humphreys, Making the Case for Liberal Education: Responding to Challenges. Association of American Colleges and Universities, 2006

3 Excerpted with permission from Assessing Outcomes and Improving Achievement: Tips and tools for Using Rubrics, edited by Terrel L. Rhodes. Copyright 2010 by the Association of American Colleges and Universities.